The Purple Team - Organization or Exercise

The Purple Team - Organization or Exercise

SCYTHE
As the cybersecurity industry continues to evolve, the use of certain terminology is changing and becoming more prevalent; such as the increased mention of Red Teams and Blue Teams inside boardrooms and IT departments. With the use of these terms, it is also means their definitions can be broad or confusing, sometimes becoming interchangeable with other terms which may or may not be applicable. For example, a staff member may use the term “Red Team” however this could refer to either an internal team within that organization or an external Penetration Testing Firm.
Fileless Malware and the Threat of Convenience

Fileless Malware and the Threat of Convenience

SCYTHE

Many of the conveniences brought via modern tools, operating systems, and applications also bring means for an adversary to execute actions while under the guise of a valid service. This is seen distinctly in the increased use of Fileless Malware.

Paintball at the WMCAT Hub Debut

Paintball at the WMCAT Hub Debut

Abraham Jones
Paintball with a purpose. That was the theme for the 6th Annual Purple Event, hosted by the West Michigan Cyber Security Consortium (WMCSC) on October 10th at the West Michigan Center for Arts and Technology (WMCAT) facility. A purple-team cyber competition is unique in that it consists of teams made up of five offensive (red) and five defensive (blue) security professionals. They work together and share skills and knowledge in order to exploit, control, and secure assets within the live fire virtual cyber city, Alphaville.
Don’t Get Comfortable Yet - The Declining Fear of Ransomware

Don’t Get Comfortable Yet - The Declining Fear of Ransomware

SCYTHE
With the news that ransomware attacks are on the decline, in favor of crypto-mining (aka “crypto-jacking”), it is tempting to now reshuffle your enterprise’s defensive priorities based on the adversary trends. But before you retask your Blue Team to focus on researching cryptocurrency miners, let’s take a moment and remember a few key fundamental facts about ransomware, and how it is still different, and more dangerous, from its money-mining “successor”.